Erenlai - Pinti Zheng (鄭晴心)
Pinti Zheng (鄭晴心)

Pinti Zheng (鄭晴心)

Born in 1987. Video director.

目前就讀實踐大學建築設計學系

Thursday, 24 December 2009 03:38

Learning to Be a Rukai

Here is the video of my experiences during the summer of 2009 when I visited the Wutai Rukai Tribe (Taidong County). .

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Friday, 01 November 2013 17:25

Taipei, Water City

 Leftover Nature by Pinti Zheng

 Text: Nick Coulson 

Connectedness to the chaos of nature, or lack of it, is inextricably linked to the modern human condition. The flow of water is a stream of consciousness running through the human psyche and a basis for spontaneous action. Yet, the modern city has tried to overcome nature, pushing it to its margins. However, nature is always rediscovering, reoccupying the human city. The flow of water is ceaseless, through, around, over and under, seamless in its passage through streams, springs, rivers, canals, lakes, reservoirs, a dancing brush swiping its calligraphy throughout the human city, leaving dynamic traces of natural and human history along its way. Like the creative flow, it can be diverted, guided, hidden, buried, yet it is always there flowing underneath and ready to emerge like a stream of consciousness.

Taipei, Water City, a new book by local author Shu Guo-zhi's, gives a historical topography of the transition of Taipei from water city to land city. It follows the alleys and lanes of the city on a journey back through time, re-exploring the canals, ditches and other stretches of water that used to cover much of the Taipei basin. Nowadays the twists and turns of Taipei's lanes and alleys mark the former routes of the canals and streams, which have been buried under tarmac and concrete. Signposts indicating former dykes, natural reservoirs and mounds are clues to tracing Taipei's forgotten heritage (The 'po' from Zhongpo for example indicated that there was once a natural reservoir there). The loss of water from the face of the city is a spatial manifestation of a city in transition, one that went from being a water-world, to a concrete industrial and commercial city.

The frolicking children and old men fishing have been removed from the river cityscape. When we see that most children in Taipei don't even know how to swim, we realize there is a general amnesia about the former water city. Taipei children may know the words to the idyllic children's song "In front of my home is a stream, behind are mountain slopes" (我家門前有小河,後面有山坡), but it is unlikely to mirror their own experience of Taipei. The Liugong Canal, gradually buried under the city in the 1970's, is perhaps the best example of this amnesia. Though there seems to have been a rupture between the generations who knew and who never knew the water city, there are still lucid memories left over amongst the older generations. For some people the name of the Liugong Canal strikes fear into their hearts as they remember it as the site of a dismembered body in a murder case, or the site where collectors of wild animals would dump their oversized crocodiles. While delivering a speech at an international Chinese literature conference, Cheng Tsun-Shing (陳傳興), an author with a background in psychoanalysis­ and head of the Flaneur publishing house, recounted, without further explanation and to the gasps of the audience, that when he walked along the Liugong Canal to school in the mornings, he would see people prodding fetuses with sticks to check if they were alive. At the time abortion was illegal. Sometimes he would smell bodies burning at night as he lived near the funeral parlour and would be left wondering if the stench was the fetuses. For others, the memory was slightly less extreme but encapsulated their fear of the filth and sewage of the hidden underworld. However, for many who lived in the age of the water city, it reminded them of their youth bathing and playing in the river, catching clams; of older men fishing, working men washing themselves at the end of the day and mothers washing the clothes in the river. It reminded them of a lost community space.

From these memories, we began shooting a short documentary, edited by Pinti Zheng, first exploring the recollections of various residents before looking at ways to reconnect this memory to contemporary Taipei, by bringing water back into the city.

 

 

Leftover architecture small
Leftover Architecture by Pinti Zheng

Thursday, 24 May 2012 00:00

Enter the Musical Universe of Orbit Folks

Here is the video I directed for the band Orbit Folks at the beginning of the year. For more info about the band, please visit their website:

Thursday, 29 December 2011 17:29

落紅

這是我去年夏天所完成影片的預告

你捧著意識,背著獸,
藏進蔭黑的洞。

在肉身腐敗前 醒來,
落紅。

Thursday, 29 December 2011 10:45

Deflower

This is the trailer of the film I realized last summer.

"Clasping your consciousness
your back turned to the beast, 
you hide in a dark, dank hole.

Wake before the rotting of the flesh,
Deflowered."

Tuesday, 27 December 2011 18:41

自由花

2011 10月3日,我們被邀請到法國南部"馬賽"演出高郁宜舞蹈作品「自由花」。

「自由花」由兩段不同的夢境,揉為一瞬美好澄明的光影。

我們要前往遙遠未知的目的地,人漸漸的離去,
我看見自己的悲傷卻感到異常美好。
夢裡,大家已死去,寧靜平和的聚在黑暗當中;當事物只剩

下本質,從黑暗裏望出去的只有光明。

了無生機的沙灘兀自豎立的枯枝,萌出了新芽兒…
希望你,與我一同走進,共同存在和發生的當下之中。

 


表演全長約四十分鐘

編導 / 舞者:高郁宜
製作 / 音樂:楊子頡
影像 / 舞台:鄭晴心

高郁宜談自由花:

「『自由花』是我第一個自編自導自跳的『作品,然而一切都是從我跟Satyana和Pinti的討論開始的...我們決定各自做一個作品,然後我的腦中就開始充滿了各種畫面包括劇本、舞台設計、場景、燈光、戲服、音樂。提到音樂是我唯一遺憾的部份,這五次的演出後有觀眾來問我為什麼大部份用西方音樂,一方面是自由花的每個部份是同步的在我腦中不斷生長,我無法同時跟一個音樂人溝通。另一方也顯示了台灣在我這一代的音樂便是如此。

回到主題,『自由花』這個作品就在騎機車、記憶中、小時候的畫本裡、夢中、刷牙時、討論中、刹車時....形成了現在這個樣貌。在心理準備方面則是不斷從生活中的各種小細節裡交換養份得來。

舞踏原本始於對西方舞蹈與社會的反叛性,而這種反叛性於今對我來說是在日常生活的態度中對於喜、怒、哀、樂這些生命重量的一種反思。而舞蹈是我熱情與喜悅的源頭,同時也是做為探索挖掘未知且真實的自己的一條途徑。

我很感謝子頡與Pinti在不同方面給我的協助
舞蹈、音樂我尚蓋愛! 我們永遠不會分開!」

 

Tuesday, 27 December 2011 16:59

Flowers of Liberty

On October 3rd, 2011, I embarked with dancer Kao Yu-i and musician Yang Zijie on a theatrical tour to Marseille, France. We gave five performances in five different parts of the city. Here is a video excerpt from the fourth performance which took place at the Alcazar library on October 14th:

"Segments from two separate dreams create a beautiful moment shining through lucid shadows
Heading towards an unknown, far away destination, the people gradually disperse
In the dream, everyone has already passed away, gathered in the tranquil darkness;
when an object is stripped to its essence, the only thing we can see out from the darkness, is light
Dead branches protrude awkwardly from the lifeless beaches, yet sprout new roots
I hope you will come and be with me, in the existing and happening present."

(Photo by Yurasleepless)

Monday, 12 December 2011 18:20

聖誕老人談末世想像


這期人籟專題''當代末世想像''

看看主編和聖誕老公公怎麼說!

Wednesday, 16 November 2011 14:23

The Flâneur in Taiwan

Taipei-based filmmaker Pinti Zheng teams up with the members of avant-jazz project Flâneur Daguerre for this documentary exploring their music, their concept of "sound images," how they "wander" through musical space, and the musical life in Taipei. Includes footage from recording sessions, live shows, and interviews. (edited by Pinti Zheng with Louis Goldford)

Tuesday, 15 March 2011 17:04

Tim Yip and Chinese Art

Tim Yip discusses the avant-garde art scene in China, and how globalization and the desire for a quick buck can affect the core values of traditional culture in societies.

Tuesday, 12 October 2010 00:00

Free Memory!

What is the difference between our memory's reality and the reality recorded in images. How can we transform, release and liberate our memory, allowing us to view the things we remember from a different perspective?

Memory is formed by history. The blind spot of memory lies in its ability to remember only that which it wishes to remember. Even so, Edward Said once said: culture is simply memory struggling not to be forgotten. Through these documentaries, which supposedly record reality, are we able to explore and understand the depths of memory, the past that has been blinded so by our prejudice? And are we able to breed understanding and concern in the wider world and to free our memory. Furthermore it is due to the presence of a camera that we bravely decide to talk of our experiences and memories. This is another level of meaning in the theme 'free memory'. Liberating our memory, does not only concern itself with objective history external to ourselves, but is also concerned with thorough retrospection on our own life and memory. Here, festival director Angelika Wang gives her own explanation of Free Memory, the main programs in this year's festival, the state of documentary and gives a few recommendations of films to look out for:

To match the theme of "Free Memory" this festival featured a memory wall - My Photo, Our Wallpaper - where you could choose a picture that meant something to you, then be photographed holding the picture which would eventually stuck on the wall. While Angelika had put up the first photo,  the opening ceremony was concluded as we all watched the proud parents of Angelika put their own picture on the wall, a tribute to the passing of memories through the generations. Perhaps by exploring this festival, you can come closer to understanding the significance and importance of documentary.

 

 
Tuesday, 07 September 2010 16:10

Georgia Crawl with Lotus

In 2009, I joined a butoh troupe.  During that year we went to many different natural settings where we filmed our performances. In August 2010 I went with Yuyi to Anping Village, near her home town in Tainan County, where she performed her last dance of the summer.  This video is my homage to her, and includes my first musical score.

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