Erenlai - Displaying items by tag: 上海
Friday, 29 October 2010 00:00

上海世博萬里長——排隊百姓的人間喜劇

打開地上的酒紅色行李箱,細細想著親友們提醒我的字句:「走路還好,逛逛看看隨時可以休息,排隊卡在那裡動彈不得,真的很累」。

 


Wednesday, 06 October 2010 18:13

An Expo-lent Australian Adventure

In early September I spent a day at the Shanghai Expo.  Bracing myself for crowds of up to 300,000 jostling queue-jumpers, I was relieved that the venue was not too packed. Most pavilions (especially later in the day) did not require any considerable time lining up.  The vast number of unused crowd barriers snaking around entrances that I bypassed at various stages of the day were testament to just how bad the queues might have been.  That said, there were still a hell of a lot of people there.

Arriving a little too late to snap up the special tickets required for China’s gargantuan pavilion (a great design actually, and one that I hope primary school kids around the world can mimic with Paddle Pop sticks), I had to settle for some of the less grandiose pavilions.

The South Korea pavilion had a great mix of 3D and interactive technology, all set to an infectious K-Pop soundtrack.  The hosts remained unflinchingly gracious in the face of relentless questioning (“Are you really Korean? REALLY? But how can you possibly speak such good Chinese?”), even managing to diffuse a vicious brawl between two frazzled and possibly queued-out ladies in the theatrette.

The India pavilion offered a snapshot of Indian civilisation from ancient times through to the recent period of economic development, but my lasting memory was of the handicraft bazaar and the tantalising smells from the curry kitchen that seduced guests meandering around the venue.

The Singapore pavilion was slick, if somewhat forgettable, and the Denmark pavilion had the actual Little Mermaid statue, shipped all the way over to China, and some bikes for visitors to cruise around on.

All good stuff but in spite of the smorgasbord of global morsels that were at my finger tips, the one pavilion I really itched to visit was that of the land of my birth – Australia.  Not just to reconnect, but to see how Australia had decided to pitch itself to what former Prime Minster Kevin Rudd famously called it’s “true friend (zhēngyǒu)”.

pf_shanghai_expo_1Upon arriving at the giant undulating pavilion, which looks a bit like a corrugated tin off-cut left to rust in a paddock, I was able to breeze in through the door, unhindered by any queue. Here I was greeted by a friendly Akubra-clad avuncular type with “G’day! When watching the movie, you might wanna sit at the back so you can see the subtitles”.  Thanks for the tip, mate.

Spiralling up a ramp around the inside of the pavilion I was treated to a potted history of Australia in series of cute dioramas. Unsurprisingly, there was an emphasis on the relationship between Australia and China.  If you were looking for any information about Aboriginal Australians, you had to wait for the last section, where the landmark 2008 apology to ‘the stolen generations’ was highlighted.

Australia’s first inhabitants were excluded from the diorama of when the English landed in Australia.  Instead of Aboriginals, as are normally included in such stylised versions of this event, the pompous-looking Englishmen were confronted with a stick-waving Koala and a stern Kangaroo with crossed arms.  Crikey!  Look at claws on that one!

While there were brief explanations of the diorama scenes, no one really seemed to be paying much attention to them. Unlike the other more hi-tech pavilions I visited, there were certainly no snazzy gizmos here to keep the punters entertained.  The crowd hurriedly snapped photos of each of the dioramas and then barrelled on up the ramp, to where though, no one seemed to know.

pf_shanghai_expo_3As it turned out, at the top of the ramp was the theatrette, where we were rounded up like cattle (how very Australian).  Once in the proverbial cattle yard, some burly Aussie bloke did his best to keep us placated until the next screening, cracking jokes in Chinese and exhorting us to be orderly “for your own safety”.  I found this guy to be pretty funny, but the people around me seemed mainly to be sniggering at his pronunciation.  Perhaps something was lost in translation.  I’m not sure how well the average Chinese person understands the Australian sense of humour.  Some didn’t seem to understand his safety instructions either, with a couple of people trying to push through the queue, even though there was a closed door at the end of it and we had been told that there were enough seats in the theatre for everyone.  The queues at the Expo were generally much more orderly than I expected based on my previous experiences lining up at various Chinese train stations and tourist venues. Nevertheless, some people still found the need to fruitlessly try to push through, only succeeding in pissing everyone else off. I’m surprised that I didn’t see more fights on the day.

The Australian movie was passable, but nowhere near the level of South Korea’s all singing, all dancing, roller coaster ride. Not that the crowd, many of whom were quite young, cared.  They all seemed very happy to be there.  The spritely attendant even managed to cajole them into chanting a mangled version of the dire Sydney Olympics-era chant “Aussie! Aussie! Aussie!”.

My favourite image from the movie was towards the beginning. Just after the characters had been introduced and the audience subjected to a montage of dodgy computer graphics, the side of an open-cut mine was spectacularly blown up.  This led in to a sequence of heavy machinery carting rocks out of the ground and onto the marketplace.  The market of course, as Australia’s recent recession-proof prosperity might testify to, is China.  What better symbol to represent Australia and China’s current relationship.  I loved it.

After the movie, we were herded down the ramp, out of the theatre and into the gift shop.  There was also some dinky-di Aussie tucker – meat pies, fish and chips, beer and other imported delicacies.  Despite my strong urge for a pie and sauce, it was all a bit pricey for me, so I skedaddled out the door and to find something a bit cheaper and possibly more tasty.

pf_shanghai_expo_4Judging by the chirpy crowds hanging around in the foyer and checking out the tacky merchandise for sale, I think the organisers had a done a good job.  The primarily Chinese guests seemed happy.  However, the Australian government wants to do more than just flog off a couple of overpriced fluffy kangaroos and tinnies of VB.  The real impact of the pavilion will be felt in the years to come, as Chinese students head to Australian universities or Chinese and Australian companies enter into business deals.

While appearing to be solid, Australia's relationship with China is not without hiccups. The level of China-awareness among the Australian public is low and at times paranoid.  My only lasting memory of China from my childhood education is of the prospectors who came out to Australia in the Gold Rush of the 1850s.  A reciprocal Chinese pavilion in downtown Sydney or Melbourne might help raise the general level of awareness of our looming northern neighbour.  You wouldn't get the full story on China, that's for sure, but at least it would be a start.  However, it is not only the Chinese government that emphasises some aspects of the country at the expense of others in order to paint an attractive picture.

Staging the Australian Expo pavilion in China means pitching the message to a Chinese audience.  If the 2010 Expo was being held in Australia, the pavilion would undoubtedly be significantly different. Australians can be very sensitive about how the nation broadcasts itself to foreign nations.  Witness the  domestic controversy generated by each new iteration of advertisements selling our wide brown land to the global tourist market.  Some Australians wish to entice foreigners with our cosmpolitan metropolises and sophisticated urban lifestyle, while others think that the beaches/bikinis/kangaroos/koalas model sells the nation best.  Given this unfortunate and out-dated dichotomy, those Australians affected by the dreaded  ‘cultural cringe’ would be best served by staying well away from the Australia pavilion.  Do yourself a favour and go to the South Korea pavilion instead.

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Wednesday, 28 April 2010 23:59

上海,讀不到結尾的詩篇

百多年前,上海是全世界冒險家的樂園。據說,這裏充滿了機會,令人轉眼暴富的機會,聽起來有些可笑卻奇幻誘人。這「機會」究竟成全了多少人的淘金夢,不過是另一些淘金者眼中的傳奇,但一座真實的城市卻在這承載著許多夢想的「機會」中打造而出。


Monday, 15 March 2010 17:58

《黑色福尔摩沙》第一回:南京冬日

1937年 12月.南京

南京的冬天,云雾漫过这个城市,雨丝涌扑砖瓦屋。密雨使得运河满溢,驱散乡间的动物,吹卷女人的发丝。湿气直扑骨髓,大自然卷曲缩实,迎接滂沱大雨。

有一位女人正在梳妆,默默看着被暴风雨扫过的庭园。她急躁地将发夹放在从意大利高价进口的梳妆台上。

杨夫人对自己说:「这些耳环再也挂不住了。」她看着自己在镜子里的倒影。说实话,她得承认,过去这段日子里,耳环同样挂不住。

过去,成群的女仆供她差遣,每次遇到外交使者的晚会,就需要手腕款待这一大群棕发的杰出人士。杨夫人实在应该把自己打扮成上海的优雅女性。美女如云一身皮草,波浪形发型,柳叶眉,兰心蕙质,迷恋中国高官。南京虽是首都,但时尚中心在上海。


过去……杨夫人停了下来,一只发针握在手上,坐在梳妆台前。

在法式镜子前面,她看着自己。在冬日午后,她看着槭树和桦树轻轻摇晃。杨夫人想起乔迁到南京后,她过世的前夫高价从加拿大进口这些树木,觉得能给接待室增添些许世界一体的感觉。她再次见到多位大使挤在房子的门口,她再次见到一楼舞厅中威尼斯的水晶光泽,她再次见到她的女仆。杨夫人觉得孤单。她早已做了决定,她把家里的成员全部赶出去,给予他们 多一些生存的机会。离开这间房子,日本人清理过城区以后,一定不会不闯进来。她觉得冷。

丈夫死了,儿子远离他乡,一个在军中,一个在台湾;她穿起一身的晚宴服,一个人孤单在房间里面,这是怎么样的想法啊!她又开始梳理了起来。

忽然间,门口响起几道敲门声,如此粗暴,她在二楼即可听到,它们像似狼一般爬上楼梯,撞过墙壁,静悄悄地虐待房内的物品。

他们已经到了吗?她看着手中的发针。过去,曾经那么辉煌;现在,一切都已经太晚。弃守的时刻到了。她一个一个收好梳子、腕饰、珠宝,把它们放在眼前梳妆台的一个小型的杯中。

敲门声越来越急促。

杨夫人双手拿起杯,仔细端详着。这个杯是婆婆留下来的,还有婆婆的婆婆,以及婆婆的婆婆的婆婆,所有家族中的女性留下来的。家庭族谱的关系如此被保留下来,杯像似生者与亡者间的维系物。这个杯听说可追溯到宋朝,而且散发独树一格的红色光泽,连皇帝都相当宠爱。这样的红色光泽被人勘定为牛血红,暗沉、腥红、散发近乎残酷的质地,不需要说出口,人们只在动物的内脏或是人类的谎言中才能找到这样被隐藏的形容词。

在杯的边缘,一只龙和一只凤从洪荒对峙到现在,随着观看的角度不同,对峙的高低结果各有不同。当她看着杯,看到杯中自己的倒影,两者的对战显得无常。杨夫人被镜面中的自己吓了一跳,她头发低垂,但穿着晚宴服。不管怎么说,算带得出场吧。她放下杯,微笑了起来。

楼下的门被粗暴的敲门声撞破。


摄影、翻译/沈秀臻

本文亦见于2010年3月号《人籁论辨月刊


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Thursday, 11 March 2010 10:53

《黑色福爾摩沙》第一回:南京冬日

1937年 12月.南京

南京的冬天,雲霧漫過這個城市,雨絲湧撲磚瓦屋。密雨使得運河滿溢,驅散鄉間的動物,吹捲女人的髮絲。濕氣直撲骨髓,大自然捲曲縮實,迎接滂沱大雨。

有一位女人正在梳妝,默默看著被暴風雨 掃過的庭園。她急躁地將髮夾放在從義大利高價進口的梳妝台上。


Wednesday, 30 April 2008 10:11

互助網路與市民社會

我是一個新上海人,別人都這麼說1991年我從四川來到了上海,和同是殘障人士的庫海洋有了一個幸福的家庭,過著簡單而平靜的生活。但在2001年的一次活動改變了我以往的想法。我得到了一個慈善活動的免費安裝假肢的機會,無償受到幫助和以往不同的心情,讓我感動不已。後來我漸漸瞭解他們的活動,並不時介紹身邊困難的殘障人士得到這個免費安裝假肢的機會,看到他們安裝了假肢有了自信,並露出滿意的笑容,讓我很激動。之後我認識了更多的殘障人士,也認識了更多的資助者。
一天,我聽說一個16歲初中女學生,在家中洗澡時面部被火燒傷而遭到毀容,我把她的事情告訴了在上海工作的一個德國朋友,德國朋友聯繫了在上海的一個德國校長,德國校長聯繫了在德國巴伐利亞州的一家基金會,基金會募集資金10萬歐元幫助她去德國醫治和康復。我的一個小小的聯繫,那個女學生得到了這麼大的幫助,對我來說真是想不到,後來我做一個殘疾人愛心網,介紹這樣的好人好事並聯繫資源幫助一些困難的殘障人士。

幾年下來,我們有了非常多的志願者來幫忙,我們的志願者來自世界20幾個國家和上海本地的,一開始是安裝假肢、贈送康復器、送衣物等,但我覺得這並不長久,應該給大家有技能培訓以及學習的機會。慢慢我們找到志願者老師辦了兩個英文班、兩個手工培訓班,還有籌辦外出活動與別人交流。志願者們也在這樣的氛圍中相互交流並有了進步。

一次在網上呼籲救助西藏6個月大的女孩來上海切除腫瘤一事,網路上的20多位元志願者來到了現實中,大家團結一起幫助女孩渡過了在醫院的37天日子。在一次醫生人為的事故上,為女孩打了麻醉針主治醫生也取消了手術的時刻,志願者們被激怒了。我們此刻明白了,志願者行為不是我們想像的這麼美好,最後和醫生耐心溝通後,終於迎來了再次手術的日子,在耐心等候女孩成功動好手術的刹那,參加那次救助的所有志願者都流淚了,大家為了救助陌生的女孩走到了一起,並被感動。
2006年我在網上看到雲南一個小村—納帕村招聘志願者老師,隨後的10月我去了那個小村莊,並瞭解到位於香格里拉縣的納帕村是一個藏族村落,,離縣城12公里,海拔3260米,現有半農半牧的藏族村民41戶,人口227人。離開小村時看到孩子們純樸的笑容,讓我很難忘。

2007年5月我在網上招聘了一位上海的志願者前往納帕村支教一年,志願者老師辭掉自己的工作義務去支教的決心和行動打動了我們。7月-8月我和上海的19名志願者一起在納帕村幫助做一些活動。

納帕村是一個靠山靠湖泊的美麗地方,村前是“高山濕地鳥類棲息地自然保護區”之一的“納帕海”,村後是高原性氣候的原始森林,納帕村的人均耕地面積不到3畝,收穫的糧食只能維持溫飽。看到了這樣的現狀,我們共同策劃為納帕村開發生態旅遊,剛開始有兩家村民有機會得到改建客房,修廁所,裝太陽能的機會,全村每家拿出一點錢,還有我們的志願者借一點,這樣幫助兩家村民改建了房子,有了條件可以接待遊客,村民旅遊收入的8%要交給村委會作為管理費。全村有了第一個廁所和淋浴房,村民從最開始的抵觸、懷疑到後來也慢慢習慣了用廁所,這是我們感到最開心的事。這個傳統的小村,我們都參加了他們的村委會的會議,從設想到計畫的設施,村民都非常的民主,這是我們感到很意外的。有一次開會討論是否願意把孩子送進城裏讀五年級,一半的家長不同意,因為要考慮路途遙遠和不安全,還有家中缺少勞動力,他們都大膽地說出了擔憂,我感到是非常好的事情,能說出來困難,那一定是想要得到幫助。

納帕的未來一直是我們討論的話題,孩子的教育是重點,全村二百多人,沒有一個讀完小學的。繼續尋找支教老師的幫助是必需的,村裏四年級的學生水準只相當於城市學生一年級的標準,但孩子們的聰明和善解人意是遠遠高於我們的評估。支教老師一年多來的經驗給了我們很多參考,比如學習漢語的同時,也希望孩子們學習藏文的讀寫能力,全村也只有喇嘛會寫和認識藏文,村民和孩子只能說話而已,現在也開設了藏文課,由村裏的一個喇嘛免費傳授,因為他說我們能做的,他也能做。

這次活動我們也帶了全村25名適齡學生到了縣城體檢身體,有14名學生體檢不合格,有身高、體重不達標,有雞胸缺鈣、有乙肝患者等等,一次全村會上,我們告訴了家長,希望家長能重視到孩子的健康問題。我們也去了41家村民家訪問和調查,作了記錄和分析,瞭解到了他們的生存狀態和現狀。

一次志願者腰部被藏獒狗咬傷,正逢村裏每年必漲的水災,我們沒有辦法出村,非常著急,村民用三塊長條木頭綁在一起,我們站在上面,村民在水里拉著木塊行走一小時把我們的志願者及時送到了縣城,打到了狂吠預苗針。之後我們到縣政府、州政府反映納帕村受水災實情,縣城府撥專款買了一條鐵船給納帕村民出行,這是他們第一次享受到了坐船的滋味,每年的水災村民不是繞山走路就是涉水過河,有了鐵船,村民縮短了進城賣松茸的時間,因為每年的7、8月是採摘松茸的時機,也是唯一有收入的機會。

很快的一次小村的體驗就要結束,我不能說我們在納帕看到的情況很理想:村民們一直以採伐森林、出售木材添補生活維持生存;納帕村前的濕地保護區成為縣城排汙、堆放垃圾的地方;草原、畜牧業在不斷退化。
我很希望08年有更多的志願者願意去納帕觀光,我們這樣做的目的,就是向志願者提供一個真實的現狀,讓他們進行不同的理解,然後做出屬於自己的判斷。但無論如何,我們強調的,始終堅持的是,我們需要瞭解他們在想什麼,因為我們和他們生活在一起。
(Photo by C. Shen)

Saturday, 25 August 2007 21:20

第一次打工

我第一次打工,在深圳电子厂,手机充电器底座的连接工作。工作3个月,一个月700元人民币,不包括吃住。带回来1000人民币。上海好像比较可靠。我是零时工。如果一年做得好,可以升为正式工。我的梦想是帮助羊圈贫困老人见识这个世界。

附加的多媒体:
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Friday, 24 August 2007 22:31

第一次打工

我第一次打工,在深圳電子廠,手機充電器底座的連接工作。工作3個月,一個月700元人民幣,不包括吃住。帶回來1000人民幣。上海好像比較可靠。我是零時工。如果一年做得好,可以升為正式工。我的夢想是幫助羊圈貧困老人見識這個世界。

附加的多媒體:
{rokbox size=|544 384|thumb=|images/slideshow_tw.jpg|}media/articles/Workers_LiHua.swf{/rokbox}

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